Bea Boccalandro

About Bea Boccalandro

Bea Boccalandro, advisor to Business4Better, is a strategy consultant, writer and frequent public speaker on business involvement in societal causes. She is president of VeraWorks, a global consulting firm that has helped Aetna, Allstate, Bank of America, FedEx, HP, IBM, Levi Strauss & Co., The Walt Disney Company and many other companies develop and enhance their community involvement programs. She also teaches corporate community involvement at Georgetown University, Boston College, the Points of Light Institute and other organizations and has authored The End of Employee Volunteering: A Necessary Step to Substantive Employee Engagement in the Community; A Helping Hand or a Hijacking? How Nonprofits Can Respond to Ever-Increasing Corporate Involvement in the Community and many other publications.

Love Your Job: Lead a Strategic Corporate Community Initiative

Wishing you found your work more enthralling? You can! And you don’t have to resign from your current position. The answer is to do your work in a way that carries  greater meaning to you than your job description suggests. It is well established that the more meaning we confer to our work, the happier we are.

Is it even possible, you might be wondering, to “add meaning” to a job?

Absolutely. Strategic corporate community involvement, which is a form of Corporate Social Reponsibility (CSR) or Shared Value, does just that. It is doing societal good, like assuaging hunger, hurricane damage or heart disease, as an integrated, and productive part of your corporate job. Continue reading

Method’s Social Responsibility Drives Rapid Success

You’ve likely heard the story of the cleaning supply company Method:

Act 1Adam Lowry and Eric Ryan start a company of dish s

oap so beautiful it makes any kitchen sink look stylish.

Act 2 – Company gets shelf space at Target by making a very effective sales pitch.


Act 3
– Employees suit up for a trendy corporate ad, now available on YouTube.

Act 4 – Company reaches $100 million in revenue and Lowry and Ryan sell it to a bigger company, becoming very wealthy.

There is, however, also an alternative version of the Method story: Continue reading

19 Compelling Business Reasons for Corporate Community Involvement

Corporate Community Involvement (CCI), or company efforts to support societal causes, is on the rise.

A CR Magazine and NYSE-Euronext survey of over 300 companies, for example, found that 72 percent of respondents have CCI or other corporate responsibility programs and that 77 percent say these programs will expand over the next three years.  One reason for the popularity of CCI is that its business value is becoming increasingly evident.

Even noted Harvard Business School business strategist Michael Porter considers CCI an effective way to increase a company’s competitive advantage. Similarly, the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship collaborated with McKinsey & Company on research that lays out the paths by which CCI adds value to business. More specifically, there is evidence that CCI makes a measurable difference on both internal and external business functions, as follows: Continue reading

Tips for Nonprofits: 5 Keys to Working With Corporate Partners

Because nonprofit managers are unaccustomed to corporate presence, nonprofit-business partnerships remain notoriously difficult. Still, there is no question that there are ways to succeed and that success often takes nonprofits to previously unimagined levels of impact. Indeed, there are enough successes (and failures) to identify five strategies that help ensure, not only that partnerships will not fall apart, but that they truly magnify the social sector impact. Continue reading

The Latent Power of Corporate Partnerships

Nonprofit leaders are increasingly realizing the latent power of corporate partnerships. Bill Shore founded and built one of the nation’s largest anti-hunger organizations. Share Our Strength (SOS), by rejecting what he calls the system of setting for that tiny margin of the financial universe that consists of leftover wealth.

Continue reading

Beyond Corporate Charity: Doing Business for Better

White Paper: Stop The Charity and Start the Impact

Stop The Charity and Start The Impact (a Business4Better white paper)

The way beyond the self-limiting altruistic corporate charity of the 20th century  is business integrated community involvement, which brings charity to the core of business operations and makes business interests central to community involvement. This 2.0 version of corporate giving synergistically melds commerce and charity to the point of making them indistinguishable.

A sales representative might educate clients about reducing their carbon footprint while trying to sell a product upgrade or a corporate call center might staff a community help line in addition to taking customer calls. Continue reading