How to Build and Grow a Successful Cross-Sector Partnership

This is a guest post by Jeff Hoffman, president of Jeff Hoffman & Associatesa global philanthropy and civic engagement firm that enables businesses, organizations and individuals to re-imagine a world full of hope, promise and opportunity. This article originally appeared on the Reimagining Service blog.

Business professionals and not-for-profit directors often have very different perspectives. There are inequities in power and differences in resources. Building a good working relationship is critical to success. Differences can be worked through by developing strategies, including setting clear expectations and goals, based on achieving mutually beneficial results.

This is the description of, Partnerships That Work, the panel I moderated at the Business4Better conference. To illustrate the best attributes of partnerships, I choose two that demonstrate the positive impact to both parties when there are shared goals and defined outcomes;  Disneyland Resort and CHOC Children’s,  The Boeing Company and Inside The Outdoors. Continue reading

Do Great Companies Make Great States?

This post is by guest blogger Bahar Gidwani, co-founder and CEO of CSRhub which provides access to corporate social responsibility and sustainability ratings and information on 7,000+ companies from 135 industries in 90 countries. This article previously appeared on the CSRhub blog

“I’d like to thank the great citizens of our wonderful state…”  How many times have you heard this greeting?  It implies that good citizens are responsible for building a better community.  The Citizen’s United Supreme Court case added to the view that corporations are “citizens” in certain senses.  So, do “good” corporate citizens contribute also to building “good” states?  Some intriguing research on this topic is now possible thanks to a new corporate social responsibility ratings database from CSRHub.

It is hard to compare corporate and state social performance without making some fairly broad assumptions.  For companies, we can measure how they treat the environment, their communities, and their employees.  We can also assess how well companies are governed by their investors, boards, and management teams.  For states or other communities, we can measure things such as education levels, unemployment levels, divorce rates, or how many crimes are committed. Continue reading

Technology and the Nonprofit: A Blog Roundup from Stanford Social Innovation Review

This post is by guest blogger Mary Harrison, Stanford student and Stanford Social Innovation Review intern.

The field of technology is one important area of successful partnerships between nonprofits and businesses. Health care, education, and banking are three sectors that are currently using groundbreaking technology partnerships between businesses and nonprofits.

These technologies are often very simple and inexpensive but can make an extraordinary impact in people’s lives. Nonprofit/business partnerships can provide benefits to both organizations involved.

Here are some recent Stanford Social Innovation Review blogs that have been written about innovative partnerships. Continue reading

Defining Sports and Social Change: Sports as a Vehicle for Advocacy, Awareness and Fundraising

This post, last in a series of three, is by guest blogger Howard Brodwin of Sports and Social Change, a sports marketing firm focused on cause marketing, CSR and social enterprise development.

This is my final segment on “Defining Sports and Social Change” and here I’ll be shining a light where sports are used as a platform for advocacy, awareness and fundraising campaigns. This is the category most casual sports fans and active “weekend warriors” are familiar with, where we see sports as a central, unifying platform to rally an audience and raise awareness and/or funds around a particular cause.  

Probably the most common examples are the thousands of run/walks, marathons and endurance races that happen every year, raising funds and awareness around a myriad of diseases and critical social issues. Run/Walk/Ride events have proven to be effective fundraisers and are used by some of the largest nonprofits and cause programs in the world including American Cancer Society, National Multiple Sclerosis Society and the Alzheimer’s Association. Continue reading

Defining Sports and Social Change: Sports Programming as a Development Tool

This post, second in a series of three, is by guest blogger Howard Brodwin of Sports and Social Change, a sports marketing firm focused on cause marketing, CSR and social enterprise development.

In the first segment of this series, I talked about sports programming for underserved populations, including sports for people with disabilities and programs for economically disadvantaged communities. Here, I’m focusing on sports programming that operates as a developmental platform to tackle specific social issues. These programs are similar to the ones mentioned in the previous post as both are rooted in providing a sport or activity, however the end goal here is a bit different. Programs in the development space have specific outcomes attached to their programs such as literacy and education, disease prevention, or peace building and reconciliation, and the sports activity is central to initiating that change. Defining Sports and Social Change

While there are many on-going “sport for development” initiatives, what’s also common in this category are programs implemented to address immediate issues that arise during a humanitarian crisis, natural disasters and in conflict/post-conflict zones. Continue reading

Defining Sports and Social Change: Sports Programs for Underserved Communities

This post is by guest blogger Howard Brodwin of Sports and Social Change, a sports marketing firm focused on cause marketing, CSR and social enterprise development.

What is a sports nonprofit organization?

In developing cause marketing and corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs around sports, this is a question my organization runs into quite often. While some people are familiar with a few well-known sports related nonprofits like Special Olympics or the Boys and Girls Clubs, the breadth and depth of what the programs in this space provide is truly unique. Recognizing the differences surrounding how these programs work and what type of impact they strive for are vitally important to anyone who wants to create an effective for-profit/nonprofit relationship in sports.

For those of you who come from the business side of the equation, I hope this provides a clearer picture of the overall sports nonprofit landscape so you can make better-informed decisions when selecting a nonprofit partner for cause marketing campaigns or broader CSR initiatives.

Continue reading

Widespread Empathy: Rewiring Your Organization for Intuition

Guest blogger Dev Patnaik, CEO of Jump Associates, a strategy and innovation firm will be speaking at Business4Better Conference and Expo on May 1st.

 

How many times have you stared at a competitor’s new product and said, “We had that idea two years ago, but we just didn’t act on it.” Well, why not? Did you think the market research wasn’t quite right? Did you become convinced that it wasn’t a good idea when you couldn’t rally other people around it? Did people get in your way with stupid or irrelevant questions that tied the team up in a state of analysis paralysis? The difference between good companies and great companies is not the quality of their ideas. It’s their ability to anticipate and act on the needs of their customers.

Empathy Definition

Empathy Definition (Photo credit: That Girl Crystal)

Companies with a widespread sense of empathy prosper over the long term. Continue reading